Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

03

Jul

Why the ‘War on Coal’ Campaign Will Likely Fall Flat—Again
By Coral Davenport, nationaljournal.com
With­in hours of Pres­i­dent Obama’s sweep­ing cli­mate speech last week, Repub­li­can cam­paign com­mit­tees reignit­ed the charge that the pres­i­dent has declared “War on Coal.” They blast­ed inbox­es and air­waves with “War on Coal” talk­ing…

Why the ‘War on Coal’ Campaign Will Likely Fall Flat—Again
By Coral Davenport, nationaljournal.com

With­in hours of Pres­i­dent Obama’s sweep­ing cli­mate speech last week, Repub­li­can cam­paign com­mit­tees reignit­ed the charge that the pres­i­dent has declared “War on Coal.” They blast­ed inbox­es and air­waves with “War on Coal” talk­ing…

29

May

Timeline Photos | Facebookfacebook.com

31

Mar

Album Art
219 plays Get

beingblog:

An hour with the extraordinary humanity of Congressman John Lewis. The civil rights movement he helped animate was — as he tells it — love in action. He opens up the art and the discipline that made nonviolence work then — and that he offers up for our common life even today. John Lewis so gives voice to the meaning of Passover and Holy Week.

08

Sep

explore-blog:

Gay veteran talks to Mitt Romney about marriage equality – priceless.

( dooce)

22

Aug

npr:

The researchers at Pew Social & Demographic Trends aren’t holding back in their new report on the middle class. It calls the last 11 years, “the lost decade” for the country’s middle class. The highlight from the report issued today is that the middle class is poorer, earning less and shrinking.
via Pew: Middle Class Poorer, Earning Less And Shrinking : The Two-Way

npr:

The researchers at Pew Social & Demographic Trends aren’t holding back in their new report on the middle class. It calls the last 11 years, “the lost decade” for the country’s middle class. The highlight from the report issued today is that the middle class is poorer, earning less and shrinking.

via Pew: Middle Class Poorer, Earning Less And Shrinking : The Two-Way

On Message: Help Minnesota Public Radio News track campaign materials

mprnews:

You’ll be likely bombarded with political ads, fliers and emails between now and the election on November 6. We want to be able to fact check the claims made in these messages and let you know who’s paying for them. But first, we need your help collecting them.

If you get any fliers or emails, see any ads in small local newspapers or magazines, or receive any voicemails, please share them with us.

Here’s how to share them with us:

• Forward any emails to onmessage@mpr.org

• Take a photo or scan any fliers or print ads and either email them toonmessage@mpr.org - or submit them here

• You can also physically mail fliers or print ads to:
On Message c/o MPR News, 480 Cedar St., St. Paul, MN 55101

Any questions? Let us know at onmessage@mpr.org

npr:

The woman, in her 80s, was reportedly upset at the way the fresco had deteriorated and took it on herself to “restore” the image.
BBC Europe correspondent Christian Fraser says the delicate brush strokes of Elias Garcia Martinez have been buried under a haphazard splattering of paint.
The once-dignified portrait now resembles a crayon sketch of a very hairy monkey in an ill-fitting tunic, he says.
via BBC News - Spanish fresco restoration botched by amateur

npr:

The woman, in her 80s, was reportedly upset at the way the fresco had deteriorated and took it on herself to “restore” the image.

BBC Europe correspondent Christian Fraser says the delicate brush strokes of Elias Garcia Martinez have been buried under a haphazard splattering of paint.

The once-dignified portrait now resembles a crayon sketch of a very hairy monkey in an ill-fitting tunic, he says.

via BBC News - Spanish fresco restoration botched by amateur

03

Jul

newyorker:

In this week’s issue, Nathan Heller writes about TED, “a constellation of conferences whose style and substance has helped color our own moment in public intellectual life.”  
Here, Heller looks at five key TED talks, and discusses what they illuminate about the most successful lecture series ever given: http://nyr.kr/MoTxKO

newyorker:

In this week’s issue, Nathan Heller writes about TED, “a constellation of conferences whose style and substance has helped color our own moment in public intellectual life.”  

Here, Heller looks at five key TED talks, and discusses what they illuminate about the most successful lecture series ever given: http://nyr.kr/MoTxKO

30

Apr

Public / private investments - foster care

http://www.freep.com/article/20120426/NEWS06/204260582/Western-Michigan-University-s-first-4-year-grad-leads-way-for-former-foster-youth

GREAT example of how we could structure private / public partnerships that will make economic sense and is just the right thing to do.

Start with someone having a good idea, solicit private dollars from a community of people who care about the outcomes, then if the idea is solid ramp it up with investments from targeted government programs so it can scale.

In this example some big-hearted folks wanted to see a few former foster kids graduate from college, so they made it happen. Now the Department of Human Services is giving $600k to ramp up the program at five more colleges. This is a smart investment, as 1 in 20 foster care kids usually go to college, and will result in kids graduating, paying more in taxes, possibly starting companies and hiring people, etc. It’s a win-win.

The myth of good schools

This story is representative of a bunch of recent stories and also of a cultural meme that there are “good schools” and it’s expensive to live around them:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/want-to-live-near-a-good-school-it-will-cost-an-extra-205000/2012/04/20/gIQAaDBUVT_blog.html

From the article:

Not surprisingly, Rothwell also finds that middle- and high-income students are far more likely to attend good schools than low-income students are.”

There’s a reason for that… it’s not that there are “good schools” and then rich people come live around them and bid up the price of housing. It’s that wherever well-educated people live they’re going to setup good schools. They’re going to make sure the buildings are in good repair, there is money for sports and arts, the kids have iPads, and being products of higher education and realizing how important this has become for a middle class life they will make sure their kids do homework and hire tutors if necessary. In short, they will demand excellence from their schools and in most cases will get it. And this in turn will draw the better teachers. It’s a virtuous cycle.

Parents play a bigger role in the whole education discussion than what we’ve thought. “Good schools” means there’s a community of parents who care about the quality of schools, not that out of nowhere this great group of teachers sprung up and the surrounding community just got lucky.